The Observer lets you automate actions on your helpdesk when specified events occur in a ticket in real time. You can use it to modify statuses, change priorities and even send out notification alerts as soon as certain conditions are met. For example, you could get the Observer to reopen resolved tickets automatically as soon as a customer replies, or to send an email to the Head of Support the minute a customer submits an unsatisfied rating; thus ensuring that your agents don't have to waste time waiting for certain events to occur and that you can stay on top of things as they happen. 


Unlike the Dispatch'r (which acts on newly-created tickets) and the Supervisor (which runs once every hour and checks all tickets in the helpdesk against its rules), the Observer is a trigger-based automation that constantly watches all activities in your helpdesk and matches them against the conditions you've specified. Also, the Dispatch'r comes into play at the time of creating a new ticket whereas the Observer comes into play when you need any actions to be taken on existing tickets based on a trigger.


Anatomy of the Observer


a) What triggers this rule? Any ticket-related event in the helpdesk that is caused by a user causes the Observer to spring into action.


b) Who causes the event? You can choose to mention whether the rule should only be executed if an agent causes the event, if a requester does, or either.


Note: The requester can include any contact in the CC and BCC field of the ticket.


c) What other conditions should the ticket match? You can specify the properties that a ticket has to possess for the rule to be applied to it. Actions can be performed on a ticket if it matches certain ticket properties, or based on which company/contact created the ticket. Here are the three kind of fields and what they mean:


Icon
Name
Where to find it
Visibility



Ticket fields are the properties of a ticket, such as ticket status, priority, subject, description, etc.
Admin >  General Settings > Ticket Fields
Agents and Customers.

Customers can see and edit fields allowed by the helpdesk in the ticket form.



Contact fields are the properties of the requester of the ticket, such as requester email, timezone, etc.

Admin >  General Settings > Customer Fields > Contacts
Agents and Customers.

Customers can see and edit fields allowed by the helpdesk in profile settings.



Company fields are the properties of the requester's company, such as company name, domain, etc.
Admin >  General Settings > Customer Fields > Companies
Agents.


d) What actions should this rule perform? Specify which actions should be executed if all the conditions are met - anything from changing the ticket's priority to deleting it.


All the rules you create will be listed in the Observer page. You can edit an existing rule or delete/deactivate it by hovering over the option and choosing Edit or Delete/Deactivate. You can also use Clone to create a copy of an existing rule and tweak it as per your requirements. Please note that Observer rules are processed sequentially, and so the changes performed by one rule might affect how subsequent rules get executed.


A quick guide to creating an Observer rule

  • Login to the helpdesk as an Administrator.
  • Go to Admin > Helpdesk Productivity > Observer. 
  • Click on New Rule.
  • Enter an appropriate name and description for the rule.



  • Select a trigger from the dropdown list and choose its filters. For example, if the trigger is that a ticket’s priority has been changed from low to high, you choose the Priority is changed trigger from the dropdown list and then specify that the change is from Low to High.
    • You can add additional triggers by clicking Add New Event.

    • You can delete a trigger by clicking the - icon.

    • Choose whether the event has to be performed by a requester or an agent, or either.

    • You can reorder your triggers by hovering over the menu button next to the - option



  • Choose which conditions should be met for the rule to be triggered.
    • Specify whether all of the conditions have to be present for the action to be performed, or if just one is sufficient.

    • You can delete a condition by clicking on the - icon.

Here's a sample first responder rule that only acts on unassigned tickets from IT companies in Arizona and Berlin; these tickets are assigned to the responder and the supervisor is added as a watcher to the tickets:



  • Select an action from the dropdown, and choose its filters.

    For example, if you want to set the status to Closed, select Set Status As from the first dropdown and then select Closed.

  • Click Save once you’re done.


You can even use the Observer to trigger a webhooks call as soon as a specified event occurs. 


Notes:

  • The conditional elements are not case-sensitive. So, if you're going to create a rule that automatically sends an email to the CEO the minute the priority of a bug report is changed, then the rule will work for tickets which have the word 'bug' or 'Bug' in their subject/description.
  • If you're setting up a rule which acts on tickets whose subject/description contains 'refund', tickets with the words 'refunded' in their subject/description will also match the rule. Similarly, a rule which is supposed to act on tickets whose subject/description contains 'want refund' will also act on tickets whose subject/description has 'want refund now'. However, tickets whose subject/description contain 'refund' will not be acted on by this rule.



The Observer lets you automate actions on your helpdesk when the events you specify are triggered in a ticket (in real-time). You can use it to modify status, change priorities and even send out notification alerts as soon as certain conditions are met. For example, you could get the Observer to reopen resolved tickets the moment a customer replies back automatically, to shoot out an email to the Head of Support the minute a customer submits an unsatisfied rating. This way, your agents don't have to keep an eye on some tickets or sit around waiting for certain events to happen and you can stay on top of things as they happen. 


Unlike the Dispatch'r (which acts on newly created tickets) and the Supervisor (which runs once every hour and checks all tickets in the helpdesk against its rules), the Observer is a trigger-based automation that constantly watches all activities in your helpdesk and matches them against the conditions you specified. Also the Dispatch'r comes into play at the time of creating a new ticket whereas the Observer comes into play when you need any actions to be taken on existing tickets based on a trigger. Dispatch'r (which acts on newly created tickets) and the Supervisor (which runs once every hour and checks all tickets in the helpdesk against its rules), the Observer is a trigger-based automation that constantly watches all activities in your helpdesk and matches them against the conditions you specified. Also the Dispatch'r comes into play at the time of creating a new ticket whereas the Observer comes into play when you need any actions to be taken on existing tickets based on a trigger.


Anatomy of the Observer


a) What triggers this rule? Any ticket related event in the helpdesk that is caused by a user causes the Observer to spring into action.


b) Who causes the event?  You can choose to mention whether the rule should be executed only if an agent causes the event or if a requester does; choose 'Anyone' if it doesn't matter who causes the event. 


Note: The requester can include any contact in the CC and BCC field of the ticket.


c) What other conditions should the ticket match? You can specify the properties that a ticket has to possess for the rule to be applied to it. Actions can be performed on a ticket, if it matches certain ticket properties or based on which company/contact created the ticket. Here are the three kind of fields and what they mean:


Icon
Name
Where to find it
Visibility



Ticket fields are properties of a ticket, like ticket status, priority, subject, description, etc.
Admin >  General Settings > Ticket Fields
Agents and Customers.

Customers can see and edit fields allowed by helpdesk in the ticket form.



Contact fields are properties of the requester of the ticket like requester email, timezone etc.

Admin >  General Settings > Customer Fields > Contacts

Agents and Customers. 

Customers can see and edit fields allowed by helpdesk in profile settings.



Company fields are properties of the company of the ticket requester like its name, domain etc.
Admin >  General Settings > Customer Fields > Companies 
Only Agents.


d) What actions should this rule perform? Specify which actions have to be executed if all the conditions are met. It could be anything from changing the ticket's priority to deleting it.


All the rules you create will be listed in the Observer page. You can edit an existing rule or delete/deactivate it by hovering over the option and choosing Edit or Delete/Deactivate. You can also use the 'Clone' option to create a copy of an existing rule and tweak it as per your requirement. Please note that Observer rules are processed sequentially. The changes performed by one rule might affect how subsequent rules get executed.


Quick guide to creating an Observer rule


  • Login to the helpdesk as an administrator.
  • Click on the Admin tab.
  • Under Helpdesk Productivity, click on Observer. 
  • Click on the New Rule button.
  • Enter an appropriate name and description for the rule.


  • Choose a trigger from the drop down list and select the filters for it. For example: If the trigger is that a ticket’s priority has been changed from low to high, you choose the ‘Priority is changed’ trigger from the drop down list and then select that it’s been changed from ‘Low’ to ‘High’ on the corresponding filters. 
    • You can add additional triggers by clicking on Add New Event.

    • You can delete a trigger by clicking on the ‘-’ symbol in red. 

    • Choose whether the event has to be performed by a requester or an agent. If it doesn’t matter whether it’s an agent or a requester, select ‘Agent or Requester’.

    • You can reorder your triggers by hovering over the menu button next to the "-" option


  • Choose which conditions should be met for the rule to be triggered.
    • Specify whether all of the conditions have to be present for the action to be performed or just one of them is sufficient.

    • You can delete a condition by clicking on the ‘-’ symbol in red.

Here's a sample first responder rule that only acts on unassigned tickets from IT companies in Arizona and Berlin; these tickets are assigned to the responder and the supervisor is added as a watcher to the tickets.



  • Choose an action from the drop down list and select the filters for it. 

    For example, if you want to set the status as ‘Closed’, select ‘Set Status As’ from the first drop down list and then select ‘Closed’ on the second drop down list.

  • Hit Save once you’re done to save the rule. 





You can even use the Observer to trigger a webhooks call as soon as an event of your specification occurs. 


Notes:

  • The conditional elements are not case-sensitive. So, if you're going to create a rule that automatically sends an email to the CEO the minute the priority of a bug report is changed, then the rule will work for tickets which have the word 'bug' or 'Bug' in their subject/description.
  • If you're setting up a rule which acts on tickets whose subject/description contains 'refund', tickets with the words 'refunded' in their subject/description will also match the rule. Similarly, a rule which is supposed to act on tickets whose subject/description contains 'want refund' will also act on tickets whose subject/description has 'want refund now'. However, tickets whose subject/description contain 'refund' will not be acted on by this rule.